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Florida Legislators Introduce Safe Waterways Act

Florida Legislators Introduce Safe Waterways Act

Nearly one million acres of coastal estuaries and nine thousand miles of Florida’s streams and rivers are verified impaired for fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). However, no state requirement exists to consistently inform the public of this risk.

Meet Calusa Waterkeeper’s New Executive Director Trisha Botty

Meet Calusa Waterkeeper’s New Executive Director Trisha Botty

Calusa Waterkeeper has a new Executive Director. Trisha Botty most recently served as Head of Social Impact and Connectivity at Collaboratory in Fort Myers. Her background includes positions in government, philanthropy, organized labor, and nonprofits in the D.C. metro area, Upstate New York, and Southwest Florida.

Fort Myers Takes out Debt to Make up for Neglected Water Quality

Fort Myers Takes out Debt to Make up for Neglected Water Quality

Fort Myers is set to spend over $60 million to improve the water quality in the Caloosahatchee. The city already accepted blame for repeatedly dumping untreated wastewater into waterways after the FDEP filed a consent order that detailed numerous violations of clean water regulations.

Calusa Waterkeeper Welcomes Trisha Botty as its New Executive Director

Calusa Waterkeeper Welcomes Trisha Botty as its New Executive Director

Calusa Waterkeeper is pleased to announce the appointment of Trisha Botty to the position of Executive Director. Botty brings a wealth of advocacy, government, and nonprofit experience to the organization, which is dedicated to the protection of clean water in the Caloosahatchee River & Estuary, Lake Okeechobee, Charlotte Harbor, Estero Bay, and other portions of Lee, Hendry, Glades and Charlotte Counties’ watersheds.

Words from the Waterkeeper, Episode 30

Words from the Waterkeeper, Episode 30

This week’s water updates include the persistent bloom on Lake Okeechobee, the Caloosahatchee River, and new technology to test airborne toxins related to harmful algal blooms.

Algae found floating in Cape Coral canals

Algae found floating in Cape Coral canals

John Cassani is the Calusa Waterkeeper and says there were multiple factors leading to the green algae. These include rain, water movement and warm water temperature. But the dominant force is runoff.

Life Sometimes Finds a Way

Life Sometimes Finds a Way

One recent August day, a wandering ecologist named John Cassani found himself bumping up onto Mound Key Archaeological State Park in the middle of the Estero Bay Aquatic Preserve. There, the Calusa Indians once discarded their seashells in vast quantities, with intent.

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